In the Heart of the Sea: The Epic True Story That Inspired Moby-Dick

The Number One best-selling, epic true-life story of one of the most notorious maritime disasters of the 19th century, beautifully reissued alongside Philbrick's new paperback, Sea of Glory. The sinking of the whaleship Essex by an enraged spermwhale in the Pacific in November 1820 set in motion one of the most dramatic sea stories of all time: the twenty sailors who survived the wreck took to three small boats (one of which was again attacked by a whale) and only eight of them survived their subsequent 90-day ordeal, after resorting to cannibalising their mates. Three months after the Essex was broken up, the whaleship Dauphin, cruising off the coast of South America, spotted a small boat in the open ocean. As they pulled alongside they saw piles of bones in the bottom of the boat, at least two skeletons' worth, with two survivors -- almost skeletons themselves -- sucking the marrow from the bones of their dead ship-mates.
Views: 1 158

Why Read Moby-Dick?

Moby-Dick is perhaps the greatest of the Great American Novels, yet its length and esoteric subject matter create an aura of difficulty that too often keeps readers at bay. Fortunately, one unabashed fan wants passionately to give Melville's masterpiece the broad contemporary audience it deserves. In his National Book Award- winning bestseller, In the Heart of the Sea, Nathaniel Philbrick captivatingly unpacked the story of the wreck of the whaleship Essex, the real-life incident that inspired Melville to write Moby- Dick. Now, he sets his sights on the fiction itself, offering a cabin master's tour of a spellbinding novel rich with adventure and history. Philbrick skillfully navigates Melville's world and illuminates the book's humor and unforgettable characters-finding the thread that binds Ishmael and Ahab to our own time and, indeed, to all times. A perfect match between author and subject, Why Read Moby-Dick? gives us a renewed appreciation of both Melville and the proud seaman's town of Nantucket that Philbrick himself calls home. Like Alain de Botton's How Proust Can Change Your Life, this remarkable little book will start conversations, inspire arguments, and, best of all, bring a new wave of readers to a classic tale waiting to be discovered anew.
Views: 1 083

The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull, and the Battle of the Little Bighorn

Watch a video Read discussion questions for "The Last Stand." The bestselling author of "Mayflower" sheds new light on one of the iconic stories of the American West Little Bighorn and Custer are names synonymous in the American imagination with unmatched bravery and spectacular defeat. Mythologized as Custer's Last Stand, the June 1876 battle has been equated with other famous last stands, from the Spartans' defeat at Thermopylae to Davy Crockett at the Alamo. In his tightly structured narrative, Nathaniel Philbrick brilliantly sketches the two larger-than-life antagonists: Sitting Bull, whose charisma and political savvy earned him the position of leader of the Plains Indians, and George Armstrong Custer, one of the Union's greatest cavalry officers and a man with a reputation for fearless and often reckless courage. Philbrick reminds readers that the Battle of the Little Bighorn was also, even in victory, the last stand for the Sioux and Cheyenne Indian nations. Increasingly outraged by the government's Indian policies, the Plains tribes allied themselves and held their ground in southern Montana. Within a few years of Little Bighorn, however, all the major tribal leaders would be confined to Indian reservations. Throughout, Philbrick beautifully evokes the history and geography of the Great Plains with his characteristic grace and sense of drama. "The Last Stand" is a mesmerizing account of the archetypal story of the American West, one that continues to haunt our collective imagination.
Views: 974

Bunker Hill: A City, a Siege, a Revolution

Nathaniel Philbrick, the bestselling author of In the Heart of the Sea and Mayflower, brings his prodigious talents to the story of the Boston battle that ignited the American Revolution. Boston in 1775 is an island city occupied by British troops after a series of incendiary incidents by patriots who range from sober citizens to thuggish vigilantes. After the Boston Tea Party, British and American soldiers and Massachusetts residents  have warily maneuvered around each other until April 19, when violence finally erupts at Lexington and Concord.  In June, however, with the city cut off from supplies by a British blockade and Patriot militia poised in siege, skirmishes give way to outright war in the Battle of Bunker Hill. It would be the bloodiest battle of the Revolution to come, and the point of no return for the rebellious colonists. Philbrick brings a fresh perspective to every aspect of the story. He finds new characters, and new facets to familiar ones. The real work of choreographing rebellion falls to a thirty-three year old physician named Joseph Warren who emerges as the on-the-ground leader of the Patriot cause and is fated to die at Bunker Hill. Others in the cast include Paul Revere, Warren’s fiancé the poet Mercy Scollay, a newly recruited George Washington, the reluctant British combatant General Thomas Gage and his more bellicose successor William Howe, who leads the three charges at Bunker Hill and presides over the claustrophobic cauldron of a city under siege as both sides play a nervy game of brinkmanship for control. With passion and insight, Philbrick reconstructs the revolutionary landscape—geographic and ideological—in a mesmerizing narrative of the robust, messy, blisteringly real origins of America.
Views: 915

Second Wind: A Nantucket Sailor's Odyssey

At 22, Nat Philbrick won the Sunfish North American Championship. Fifteen years later he decided to give it another try, embarking on a personal voyage of discovery that took him from the many ponds of his native Nantucket to the championship in the American heartland. A warm, funny, often moving story of a sailor, his family, and an island...and the voyage that brought them together.
Views: 820

Sunshine Meadows

Crime doesn't pay. Or does it? If you can't afford to buy something, you can just go and steal it, can't you? You'll probably get away with it. Unless you are really unlucky. Then you'll just have to live with the consequences.This is the tale of an ingenious robbery. One that goes wrong.Crime doesn't pay. Or does it? If you can't afford to buy something, you can just go and steal it, can't you? You'll probably get away with it. Unless you are really unlucky. Then you'll just have to live with the consequences.This is the tale of an ingenious robbery. One that goes wrong.Jen lives right in the middle of a massive run down council estate with her fifteen year old son. For years, she has dreamed of leaving for a better life, but simply doesn’t have the money to do so. Until she wins the lottery, that is. But will that win be the start of good or bad luck? Approx 8800 words.
Views: 780

Away Off Shore: Nantucket Island and Its People, 1602-1890

The history of Nantucket Island has too often been reduced to a collection of quaint legends and warmed-over whaling tales. In contrast, Nathaniel Philbrick's Away off Shore focuses on the real people (great and obscure, famous and infamous) behind one of America's most extraordinary success stories: Nantucket, the tiny island that became the whaling capital of the world.
Views: 721

The Mayflower and the Pilgrims' New World

Adapted from the "New York Times" bestseller "Mayflower"! After a dangerous journey across the Atlantic, the Mayflower's passengers were saved from certain destruction with the help of the Natives of the Plymouth region. For fifty years a fragile peace was maintained as Pilgrims and Native Americans learned to work together. But when that trust was broken by the next generation of leaders, a conflict erupted that nearly wiped out Pilgrims and Natives alike. Adapted from the "New York Times" bestseller "Mayflower" specifically for younger readers, this edition includes additional maps, artwork, and archival photos.
Views: 700

Sea of Glory: America's Voyage of Discovery, the U.S. Exploring Expedition, 1838-1842

In this New York Times Notable Book and bestseller, the National Book Award-winning author of In the Heart of the Sea writes about one of the world's most ambitious voyages of discovery--the U.S. Exploring Expedition of 1838-1842 that included six sailing vessels and a crew of hundreds who set out to map the Pacific Ocean.
Views: 633

Bad Order

A Wrinkle in Time meets Stranger Things in an out-of-this-world fast-paced middle grade story about a sister and her special little brother fighting to save the world from an interdimensional catastrophe. Mary Day's life has always been different, because her little brother, Albie, is different. He doesn't speak, but he can communicate with Mary via mental telepathy, sending her—and her alone—"mind memos." To Albie, Mary is Pearl, the person he holds most precious. Then, one snowy day, Albie transmits an alarming two-word message: Bad order. Soon after, Mary and her best friend, Brit, discover a mysterious red mist in the woods that seems to draw them in . . . and turn all their feelings negative. A visit from three extraterrestrials (hilariously trying to pass as human) reveals the truth: there's a disastrous leak in the dimensional universe—and if Albie can't repair it, angry, evil thoughts will overtake the...
Views: 591

The Last Stand: Custer, Sitting Bull and the Battle of the Little Big Horn

Watch a video Read discussion questions for "The Last Stand." The bestselling author of "Mayflower" sheds new light on one of the iconic stories of the American West Little Bighorn and Custer are names synonymous in the American imagination with unmatched bravery and spectacular defeat. Mythologized as Custer's Last Stand, the June 1876 battle has been equated with other famous last stands, from the Spartans' defeat at Thermopylae to Davy Crockett at the Alamo. In his tightly structured narrative, Nathaniel Philbrick brilliantly sketches the two larger-than-life antagonists: Sitting Bull, whose charisma and political savvy earned him the position of leader of the Plains Indians, and George Armstrong Custer, one of the Union's greatest cavalry officers and a man with a reputation for fearless and often reckless courage. Philbrick reminds readers that the Battle of the Little Bighorn was also, even in victory, the last stand for the Sioux and Cheyenne Indian nations. Increasingly outraged by the government's Indian policies, the Plains tribes allied themselves and held their ground in southern Montana. Within a few years of Little Bighorn, however, all the major tribal leaders would be confined to Indian reservations. Throughout, Philbrick beautifully evokes the history and geography of the Great Plains with his characteristic grace and sense of drama. "The Last Stand" is a mesmerizing account of the archetypal story of the American West, one that continues to haunt our collective imagination.
Views: 416

Urban Exploration & The Curse of Chillingham Castle

Two short stories.Urban Exploration.An abandoned Victorian mental asylum, derelict for decades, sits in the middle of the English countryside. Three people set out to explore.The Curse of Chillingham Castle.Over from America on their first European holiday, tourists Mark and Susie take a detour to one of England's most haunted castles.15000 words approx.This collection consists of two short stories.Urban ExplorationAn abandoned Victorian mental asylum, derelict for decades, sits in the middle of the English countryside. Three University graduates decide to explore the decaying ruin one summer day. A week later, one of them returns for a second visit. Will this trip go as planned?The Curse of Chillingham CastleChillingham Castle is one of the most haunted places in England, with a long and bloody past. Over from America on their first European holiday, tourists Mark and Susie take a detour to the atmospheric castle. It was a decision that they would later regret. Life for them will never be quite the same again.Together, the stories come to about 15000 words long. Just long enough to fit nicely in to a couple of lunch breaks!
Views: 396

Ash

Amanda ran from an abusive marriage in Saudi Arabia with her four sons and infant daughter, Aisha. She found sanctuary at Blossom House – in the loving embrace of a community of women who understood. But always at the back of her mind was the fear that Muhammed would come for his children. Ash has grown-up feeling lost and out of place, left to her own devices by her damaged mother, abandoned to the lure of paint and canvas. She has few friends until she comes upon a group of Islamic women who promise empowerment and a mission in life – which has to be better than sacrificing herself to the twin goddesses of anorexia and social acceptance. One woman's dream is the other's nightmare.
Views: 343