The Art of War

Written in China more than 2,000 years ago, Sun Tzu's classic The Art of War is the first known study of the planning and conduct of military operations. These terse, aphoristic essays are unsurpassed in comprehensiveness and depth of understanding, examining not only battlefield maneuvers, but also relevant economic, political, and psychological factors. Indeed, the precepts outlined by Sun Tzu can be applied outside the realm of military theory. It is read avidly by Japanese businessmen and in fact was touted in the movie Wall Street as the corporate raider's bible. In addition to an excellent translation of Sun Tzu's text, Samuel Griffith also provides commentaries written by Chinese strategists, plus several thought-provoking essays on topics such as the influence of Sun Tzu on Mao Tse-tung and on Japanese military thought, the nature of warfare in Sun Tzu's time, and the life of Sun Tzu and other important commentators. Remarkable for its clear organization, lucid prose, and the acuity of its intellectual and moral insights, The Art of War is the definitive study of combat. **
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The War for All the Oceans

A brutal, action-packed account of the sea battles of the Napoleonic War by the author of the bestselling Nelson's Trafalgar and co-author of the forthcoming Gibraltar: The Greatest Siege in British History (March 2018)As he did with his much lauded Nelson's Trafalgar, Roy Adkins (now writing with wife Lesley) again thrusts readers into the perils and thrills of early-nineteenth-century warfare. From its very first page, this is an adventure story—a superb account of the naval war that lasted from Napoleon's seizure of power in 1798 to the War of 1812 with the United States. Providing a ringside seat to the decisive battles, as well as detailed and vivid portraits of sailors and commanders, press-gangs, prostitutes, and spies, The War for All the Oceans is "a rollicking, patriotic account of the Napoleonic wars that will go down well with Master and Commander fans" (The Telegraph).
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Crown, Covenant and Cromwell

Crown, Covenant and Cromwell is a groundbreaking military history of the Great Civil War or rather the last Anglo-Scottish War as it was fought in Scotland and by Scottish armies in England between 1639 and 1651. While the politics of the time are necessarily touched upon, it is above all the story of those armies and the men who marched in them under generals such as Alexander Leslie, the illiterate soldier of fortune who became Earl of Leven, James Graham, Marquis of Montrose and of course Oliver Cromwell, the fenland farmer and Lord Protector of England.Historians sometimes seem to regard battles as rather too exciting to be a respectable field of study, but determining just how that battle was won or lost is often just as important as unraveling the underlying reasons why it came to be fought in the first place or the consequences that followed. Here, Stuart Reid, one of Scotland's leading military historians, brings the campaigns and battles of those far off unhappy...
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Bomber Pilot

"Winner of the Best Aeronautical Book Award from the Reserve Officers Association of the United States "The sky was full of dying airplanes" as American Liberator bombers struggled to return to North Africa after their daring low-level raid on the oil refineries of Ploesti. They lost 446 airmen and 53 planes, but Philip Ardery's plane came home. This pilot was to take part in many more raids on Hitler's Europe, including air cover for the D-Day invasion of Normandy. This vivid firsthand account, available now for the first time in paper, records one man's experience of World War II air warfare. Throughout, Ardery testifies to the horror of world war as he describes his fear, his longing for home, and his grief for fallen comrades. Bomber Pilot is a moving contribution to American history.
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Surrender at New Orleans

General Sir Harry Smith won the lifelong respect and affection of the Duke of Wellington. Famously married to the Spanish beauty, Juana, after the siege of Badajoz in 1812, they served together to the end of the Peninsula war. With the French defeated, Harry left with the British expedition to America in 1814, and witnessed the burning of the White House. The fiery Admiral Cochrane raged bitterly “I am sorry you left a house standing in Washington – depend on it, it is a mistaken mercy”. Later, Harry joined Wellington's brother-in-law, Ned Pakenham, in the invasion of Louisiana. On 8 January 1815, they attacked General Jackson's well prepared positions protecting New Orleans. A resounding defeat for the British, in which Pakenham was killed, it fell to Harry to take part in the surrender to General Jackson, and then to convey the dismal news to London. Approaching England, he heard the dramatic news of Napoleon's escape, which led to Harry and Juana's...
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