• Home
  • Entrepreneurship

You Gotta Have Balls

A Brooklyn kid hustles his way to the top of a sports marketing and memorabilia empireBrandon Steiner went from a kid who sat in the nosebleed seats at Yankee and Shea Stadiums to CEO of Steiner Sports Marketing Inc., one of the largest sports marketing and memorabilia companies in the United States, with an inventory of more than 10,000 collectibles. You Gotta Have Balls details Steiner's multiple entrepreneurial adventures, where he has both learned and taught others his fair share of "rules." Along the way, he developed some of the most innovative approaches to business--methods that many of today's companies would be wise to observe and employ themselves.You Gotta Have Balls follows Steiner on his pathway to success by demonstrating the business philosophies that allowed him to become the powerful magnate that he is. These ideals include:First to market is everything Ask "What Else?" when working with clients to enhance relationships...
Views: 504

Burn the Business Plan

"The evangelist of entrepreneurship" (The Economist) reveals the true stories about how a range of entrepreneurs created their successful start-ups: hint, many of them never began with a business plan.Business schools teach that the most important prerequisite for starting a business is a business plan. Nonsense, says Carl Schramm in Burn the Business Plan, who for a decade headed the most important foundation devoted to entrepreneurship in this country. Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, and Google are just a few of the companies that began without one.Schramm explains that the importance of a business plan is only one of the many misconceptions about starting a company. Another is the myth of the kid genius—that all entrepreneurs are young software prodigies. In fact, the average entrepreneur is thirty-nine years old and has worked in corporate America for at least a decade. Schramm discusses why people with work experience in corporate America have an...
Views: 232

The Eye

They're often behind the scenes, letting their work take center stage. But now Nathan Williams, founder and editor in chief of Kinfolk magazine and author of The Kinfolk Table, The Kinfolk Home, and The Kinfolk Entrepreneur—with over 250,000 copies in print combined—brings 80 of the most iconic and influential creative directors into the spotlight. In The Eye, we meet fashion designers like Dries van Noten and Kris Van Assche. Directors like Spike Jonze and Melina Matsoukas. Tastemakers like Grace Coddington and Linda Rodin. We learn about the books they read, the mentors who guided them, their individual techniques for achieving success. We learn how they developed their eye—and how they've used it to communicate visual ideas that have captured generations and will shape the future. As an entrepreneur whose own work is defined by its specific and instantly recognizable aesthetic, Nathan Williams has a unique vision of...
Views: 120

High-Hanging Fruit

Grabbing the low-hanging fruit is no longer acceptable. ZICO Coconut Water founder Mark Rampolla argues that when you choose to reach higher, you can build an incredible business, be profitable, and maybe even change the world. In 2004, Mark Rampolla was successful by most standards. There was just one problem: He wasn't inspired in his job and believed he had something more to contribute to the world. When he asked himself, "What do I have to offer that will improve the world?" Rampolla realized that his big idea was hanging right overhead. From his time living in Central America, he and his family came to love drinking coconut water, just like the locals. But no one was really selling coconut water in the United States. So Rampolla chased a very ambitious goal: introducing coconut water to the American beverage market dominated by a few big players. He wasn't just starting a business; he was creating a whole new industry. ZICO Coconut Water...
Views: 58

Start Something That Matters

The incredible story of the man behind TOMS Shoes and One for One, the revolutionary business model that marries fun, profit, and social good. "A creative and open-hearted business model for our times."--The Wall Street Journal Why this book is for you: You're ready to make a difference in the world--through your own start-up business, a nonprofit organization, or a new project that you create within your current job.You want to love your work, work for what you love, and have a positive impact on the world--all at the same time.You're inspired by charity: water, method, and FEED Projects and want to learn how these organizations got their start. You're curious about how someone who never made a pair of shoes, attended fashion school, or worked in retail created one of the fastest-growing footwear companies in the world by giving shoes away.You're looking for a new model of...
Views: 50

The Last Stand of Daronwy

Twin Hills is a dying forest in an abandoned Texas oil field, now skirted by a residential neighborhood. Its protector is an ancient oak tree called Daronwy, who has turned the forest's pain into a dark magic that it hopes can keep the remaining trees safe from further harm. The spell was working, too—until a young boy from the nearby neighborhood, Jeremy Trahan, is drawn to the woods in search of the magic he senses instinctively. By finding the magic, Jeremy hopes it will help him escape the boredom and bullies that plague his life—just like in all the books he's read. But as he gets closer to discovering the gateway to the other world that the spell hides, land developers descend on the fragile forest with bulldozers and chainsaws. Will Jeremy seize the chance to leave his mundane world behind, or will he stand and fight for his haven?
Views: 41

The Ripper's Victims in Print

Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Katherine Eddowes and Mary Jane Kelly—the five known victims of Jack the Ripper—are among the most written-about women in history. Hundreds of books on the Ripper murders describe their deaths in detail. Yet they themselves remain as mysterious as their murderer. This first ever study of the victims surveys the Ripper literature to reveal what is known about their lives, how society viewed them at the time of their deaths, and how attitudes and perceptions of them have (or have not) changed since the Victorian era.
Views: 41