Broken Memory

Hiding behind an armchair, five-year-old Emma does not witness the murder of her mother, but she hears everything. And when the assassins finally leave, the young Tutsi girl somehow manages to stumble away from the scene, motivated only by the memory of her mother's last words: "You must not die, Emma!" Eventually Emma is taken in by an old Hutu woman who risks her own life to hide the child. Emma stays with the old woman and a quiet bond forms between the two, but long after the war ends, the young girl is still haunted by nightmares. When the country establishes courts to allow victims to face their tormenters in their villages, Emma is uneasy and afraid. But through her growing friendship with a young torture victim and the gentle encouragement of an old man charged with helping child survivors, Emma finds the courage to return to the house where her mother was killed and begin the journey to healing.
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42

In The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, author Douglas Adams famously proposed that the answer to the question "What is the meaning of Life?" was the number 42. Why that number? Over the years, many theories have been put forward, but Adams steadfastly refused to clarify. It has taken a dedicated fan and investigator, Peter Gill, ten years to establish just why 42 is the answer. In this brilliantly detailed, maniacally meticulous and hilariously offbeat volume,Gill gives us a whole range of reasons why 42 really is the answer.On page 42 of Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone, Harry discovers he is a wizard.Adolf Hitler turned vegetarian at the age of 42.Elvis Presley choked on his hamburger at the age of 42.Washington is the 42nd State.Channel 42 in the Stanley Hotel in Colorado, where Stephen King stayed prior to writing The Shining, shows Kubrick's film of the book in one non-stop loop.
Views: 63

Genie and Paul

One morning in May 2003, on the cyclone-ravaged island of Rodrigues in the Indian Ocean, the body of a man washes up on the beach. Six weeks previously, the night Tropical Cyclone Kalunde first gathered force, destruction of another kind hit twenty-six-year-old Genie Lallan and her life in London: after a night out with her brother she wakes up in hospital to discover that he's disappeared. Where has Paul gone and why did he abandon her at the club where she collapsed? Genie's search for him leads her to Rodrigues, sister island to Mauritius – their island of origin, and for Paul, the only place he has ever felt at home. Will Genie track Paul down? And what will she find if she does? An imaginative reworking of the French 18th century classic, 'Paul et Virginie', set in London, Mauritius and Rodrigues, Genie and Paul is an utterly original love story: the story of a sister's love for a lost brother, and the story of his love for an island that has never really existed.
Views: 61

Notes from the Hyena's Belly

In this acclaimed memoir, Mezlekia recalls his boyhood in the arid city of Jijiga, Ethiopia, and his journey to manhood during the 1970s and 1980s. He traces his personal evolution from child to soldier—forced at the age of eighteen to join a guerrilla army. And he describes the hardships that consumed Ethiopia after the fall of Emperor Haile Selassie and the rise to power of the communist junta, in whose terror thousands of Ethiopians died. Part autobiography and part social history, Notes from the Hyena's Belly offers an unforgettable portrait of Ethiopia, and of Africa, during the defining and turbulent years of the last century.
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The Mzungu Boy

For young Kariuki, life in a small village in central Kenya is one great adventure. And when he meets Nigel life becomes even more interesting. Nigel is from England and he has come to visit his great grandfather, the fearsome Bwana Ruin who owns the farm where all the villagers work. The villagers call Nigel the mzungu boy, and they view him with suspicion and fear.Nevertheless, Kariuki becomes friends with Nigel and the two spend happy days exploring the forest together. Then one day the two boys decide to hunt down Old Moses, the biggest, ugliest, oldest and meanest warthog in the forest. The hunt takes them deeper into the jungle than Kariuki has ever gone, and his beloved forest becomes a frightening place, filled with dangerous creatures, including the Mau-mau, the mysterious men who have guns and are plotting against Bwana Ruin and the white soldiers. And when Nigel suddenly disappears, Kariuki realizes that it is up to him to save his friend.
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The Bette Davis Club

The morning of her niece’s wedding, Margo Just drinks a double martini and contemplates the many mistakes she’s made in her fifty-odd years of life. Spending three decades in love with a wonderful but unattainable man is pretty high up on her list of missteps, as is a long line of unsuccessful love affairs accompanied by a seemingly endless supply of delicious cocktails. When the young bride flees—taking with her a family heirloom and leaving behind six hundred bewildered guests—her mother offers Margo fifty grand to retrieve her spoiled brat of a daughter and the invaluable property she stole. So, together with the bride’s jilted and justifiably crabby fiancé, Margo sets out in a borrowed 1955 red MG on a cross-country chase. Along the way, none of what she discovers will be quite what she expected. But it might be exactly what she’s been seeking all along. From acclaimed humor writer Jane Lotter comes this madcap, laugh-out-loud adventure, The Bette Davis Club. Revised edition: This edition of The Bette Davis Club includes editorial revisions. **
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The Lost City of Solomon and Sheba

In the heart of south-central Africa lies an ancient and ruined civilization comprising several thousand stone structures - many as large as modern towns - all surrounded by thousands of abandoned gold mines. The monuments, temples, forts and sculptures of the Zimbabwe culture are reminiscent of the classic civilizations of the Egyptians and Phoenicians. Yet, when the Royal Geographical Society sent teams to investigate in 1893, the resident natives who were living beneath the walls in thatched clay huts denied any knowledge of the vast civilization that had evidently preceded them and were ignorant of the value of gold. Robin Brown-Lowe uses incontrovertible DNA evidence to demonstrate strong links to the mighty civilizations of ancient North Africa and to propose that the Zimbabwe's gold sustained the gold-hungry pharoahs of Egypt and the famolusly gold-loving King Solomon and his lover, the Queen of Sheba. Brown-Lowe also reveals how the truth about the Zimbabwe culture has...
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