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Parallel Connection

While investigating a missing persons report, a Detective finds evidence that a plot is underway using an extremely dangerous substance; and as he discovers almost too late, the plan is already in motion to destroy another planet that he has a connection to. While he is saving one, his own planet has cut off all communications and the Detective is left wondering how he will get back home.Two similar planets, a trillion miles separating them, both in extreme danger of destruction, saved from annihilation by one man. A story of interstellar intrigue and mystery involving one man forced to overcome ever changing obstacles.While investigating a missing persons report, a Detective finds evidence that a plot is underway using an extremely dangerous substance; and as he discovers almost too late, the plan is already in motion to destroy another planet that he has a connection to. While he is saving one, his own planet has cut off all communications and the Detective is left wondering how he will get back home.
Views: 504

Twenty Years After

A new translation of Dumas's rousing sequel to The Three Musketeers, picking up twenty years after the conclusion of that classic novel and continuing the adventures of the valiant d'Artagnan and his three loyal friends. The Three Musketeers, Alexandre Dumas's most famous and enduring novel, completed its serial publication in the summer of 1844, and by the time of its book publication at the end of that year readers were already demanding a sequel. They got it starting in January, 1845, when the first chapters of Twenty Years After began to appear—but it wasn't quite what they were expecting.When Twenty Years After opens it is 1648: the Red Sphinx, Cardinal Richelieu, is dead, France is ruled by a regency in the grip of civil war, and across the English Channel the monarchy of King Charles I hangs by a thread. As d'Artagnan will find, these are problems that can't be solved with a sword thrust. In Twenty Years After, the musketeers...
Views: 256

The Secret Life of a Black Aspie

Anand Prahlad was born on a former plantation in Virginia in 1954. This memoir, vividly internal, powerfully lyric, and brilliantly impressionistic, is his story.For the first four years of his life, Prahlad didn't speak. But his silence didn't stop him from communicating—or communing—with the strange, numinous world he found around him. Ordinary household objects came to life; the spirits of long-dead slave children were his best friends. In his magical interior world, sensory experiences blurred, time disappeared, and memory was fluid. Ever so slowly, he emerged, learning to talk and evolving into an artist and educator. His journey takes readers across the United States during one of its most turbulent moments, and Prahlad experiences it all, from the heights of the Civil Rights Movement to West Coast hippie enclaves to a college town that continues to struggle with racism and its border state legacy.Rooted in black folklore and cultural ambience, and...
Views: 66

Escape Velocity

An Unforgettable Journey into the Dark Heart of the Information AgeIn Escape Velocity Mark Dery takes is on an electrifying tour of the high-tech subcultures that both celebrate and critique our wired world: would-be cyborgs who believe the body is obsolete and dream of downloading their minds into computers, cyber-hippies who boost their brainpower with smart drugs and mind machines, on-line swingers seeking cybersex on electronic bulletin boards, techno-primitives who sport "biomechanical" tattoos of computer circuitry; and cyberpunk roboticists whose Mad Max contraptions duel to the death before howling crowds.Timely, trenchant, and provocative, Escape Velocity is the first truly critical inquiry into cyberculture-essential reading for everyone interested in computer culture and the shape of things to come.
Views: 60

The Art of Cruelty

"This is criticism at its best."—Carolyn Kellogg, Los Angeles TimesWriting in the tradition of Susan Sontag and Elaine Scarry, Maggie Nelson has emerged as one of our foremost cultural critics with this landmark work about representations of cruelty and violence in art. From Sylvia Plath's poetry to Francis Bacon's paintings, from the Saw franchise to Yoko Ono's performance art, Nelson's nuanced exploration across the artistic landscape ultimately offers a model of how one might balance strong ethical convictions with an equally strong appreciation for work that tests the limits of taste, taboo, and permissibility.
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Sky Hooks

The story of a lad who was on the books at Manchester City but got injured and never made it.'A vital writer, in touch with people and the natural and constructed worlds around us.' —NICHOLAS ROYLESky hooks are like glass hammers and bubbles from spirit levels, things you get asked to find on your first day in a warehouse. In this case it is also a metaphor for dreams.Set in contemporary Manchester this story is about a lad who was on the books at City but got injured and never made it. It is a coming of age tale, and the first part of a trilogy.Praise for Neil Campbell's work'Everyone who takes contemporary fiction seriously will want to read and re-read this book.' —ANDREW BISWELL'The dialogue is note perfect and has a studied, savage banality.' —PAUL MAGRS'These are stories not of love but of need and they ache with truth; they are as eerie and lonely as any Hopper painting.' —NUALA NÍ CHONCHÚIRNeil Campbell writes, "I wrote this...
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The Red Parts

Late in 2004, Maggie Nelson was looking forward to the publication of her book Jane: A Murder, a narrative in verse about the life and death of her aunt, who had been murdered thirty-five years before. The case remained unsolved, but Jane was assumed to have been the victim of an infamous serial killer in Michigan in 1969.Then, one November afternoon, Nelson received a call from her mother, who announced that the case had been reopened; a new suspect would be arrested and tried on the basis of a DNA match. Over the months that followed, Nelson found herself attending the trial with her mother and reflecting anew on the aura of dread and fear that hung over her family and childhood—an aura that derived not only from the terrible facts of her aunt's murder but also from her own complicated journey through sisterhood, daughterhood, and girlhood. The Red Parts is a memoir, an account of a trial, and a provocative essay that interrogates the...
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Dads Under Construction

Many men today feel set adrift from the notion of themselves as "father." Times have changed, and the old, familiar, traditional models of parenting no longer work. Society has not yet evolved a strong and workable new model of parenting, or, in particular, of fathering. Dr. Neil Campbell believes the answer to the question "what is an involved father?" can be found within the experiences and stories of our own lives. In this book, he takes us into his life, first as a son, then as a father, sharing some of the profound insights he learned along the way.
Views: 12