The Harbour

Hong Kong, 1940. For the reckless young journalist Stevie Steiber, days at the Happy Valley racecourse slip into dangerous, hedonistic nights. Meanwhile Major Harry Field, a British Intelligence Officer, is investigating the recent arrival of Wu Jishang, a sophisticated publisher who owns a controversial political magazine. But it is Stevie, Jishang's close colleague and lover, who really fascinates Harry. As the British community continues to party despite the looming threat of war, the two are obsessively drawn into a dark passion. And when the Japanese army seizes the island, they are faced with terrifying challenges – how far will they go to protect each other?
Views: 535

Bright

Honorable mention in the Global Humanities Translation Prize When five-year-old Kampol is told by his father to wait for him in front of some run-down apartment buildings, the confused boy does as told—he waits, and waits, and waits, until he realizes his father isn't coming back anytime soon. Adopted by the community, Kampol is soon being raised by figures like Chong the shopkeeper, who rents out calls on his telephone and goes into debt while extending his customers endless credit. Kampol also plays with local kids like Noi, whose shirt is so worn that it rips right in half, and the sweet, deceptively cute toddler Penporn. Dueling flea markets, a search for a ten-baht coin lost in the sands of a beach, pet crickets that get eaten for dinner, bouncy ball fads in school, and loneliness so merciless that it kills a boy's appetite all combine into Bright, the first-ever novel by a Thai woman to appear in English translation. Duanwad Pimwana's urban, and...
Views: 517

Broken Soldier (Book One)

An Iraqi suicide bomber had taken his legs and an eye. Now, years later, as Mike Hurst enjoys a quiet life of retirement, he is accosted and put to sleep by an alien. When he awakens, he has his legs back and his eye. But he is no longer on the planet. When the alien tells him why he was kidnapped, he is quite skeptical. He is extremely reluctant to become the savior of all humanity.Saving the human race proves to be far more difficult than he could ever have imagined. Mike Hurst, a former Army Sergeant, is thrust into a role that should be handled by someone use to dealing with major military organizations and politicians.His new alien friend, Jonelle, is certain that he is more than capable, especially after he is upgraded with some very unique abilities. He is now able to communicate to other upgraded people, without speaking; and his mind can handle hundreds of complicated tasks simultaneously. Also, there is a great deal of self confidence to be had by possessing three times the strength of a normal human being.Mike knows that he must recruit good people. Jonelle urges him to pursue other old combat vets, who will be upgraded and brought into the warrior class. But Mike realizes, while that is important, perhaps of greater impact would be the recruitment of senior military leaders, such as an old General, whom he hated.He begins to build a staff, by kidnapping the old General, as well as one of his men from Iraq and his badly injured son and daughter-in-law. They would form the first members of his staff. Yet, in spite of small, awkward successes, he fears their progress is far too slow and nothing mankind can do will prevent the complete destruction of the human race.
Views: 399

Arid Dreams

In thirteen stories that investigate ordinary and working-class Thailand, characters aspire for more but remain suspended in routine. They bide their time, waiting for an extraordinary event to end their stasis. A politician's wife imagines her life had her husband's accident been fatal, a man on death row requests that a friend clear up a misunderstanding with a prostitute, and an elevator attendant feels himself wasting away while trapped, immobile, at his station all day. With curious wit, this collection offers revelatory insight, subtle critique, and an exploration of class, gender, and disenchantment in a changing country.
Views: 380

If It Were Up to Mrs Dada

Today is National Day. It is also Cheryl Dada's birthday. As Elderflower Home prepares for the celebration, Cheryl Dada too gets ready for her party. Between the hours of noon and seven p.m., she encounters the cantankerous residents and caregivers, her mother and people of yesteryears. What unfolds is a story about a woman coming to terms with age, loss and love.
Views: 285

Hikayat

From Lebanon's golden age, through years of civil conflict and its aftermath, these women offer a captivating portrait of a country in flux. Well-known authors such as Emily Nasarallah, Hanan al-Shaykh and Alawiya Sobh, alongside newer voices, share he desire to push boundaries, tackling subjects from the crippling effects of war in past decades, through longing for romantic adventures in a conservative society, to the functioning of families across the divides of emigration and generational conflict. The characters in these stories are on the brink of something - whether it be religious or social divides, or sexual awakening. The language reflects the great tension, and the great beauty in their transformation. And the collection as a whole reveals the rich diversity of the complex multi-cultural society out of which these stories have emerged. 'In turn lyrical, sensuous, comic and ironic ... rare and fascinating ...' Independent 'Some truly insightful, engaging work ...' New...
Views: 70

Folktales of Bhutan

From the author of Bhutanese Tales of the Yeti another dip into the library of the storytellers from the Himalayan Kingdom of Bhutan.Folktales of Bhutan is a collection of thirty-eight folktales and legends and is a first attempt by a Bhutanese to record in English the oral tradition of this kingdom in the eastern Himalayas. All of the stories recounted here were heard by the author when she was a child living in Bumthang in the central part of Bhutan and are the ones that she passes on to her children today, in the spirit of the oral tradition.In Bhutan's centuries of self-imposed isolation brought about by both its geographically remote position and political considerations, the Bhutanese oral tradition evolved and thrived. The rugged and awesome terrain and the people's closeness to nature, together with their philosophy of karmic life cycles, an unquestioning belief in unseen co-inhabitants of the earth like spirits, ghosts and demons and the creative genius of the...
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A Mighty Purpose

The inspiring story of how the iconoclastic humanitarian Jim Grant succeeded in saving the lives of tens of millions of children through his extraordinary ability to win over world leadersNicholas Kristof hailed Jim Grant as a man who "probably saved more lives than were destroyed by Hitler, Mao, and Stalin combined." Nominated by President Jimmy Carter to head UNICEF, Grant ran the United Nations agency from 1980 to 1995 and became the most powerful advocate for children the world has ever seen. To ensure that even children trapped by war received health care and immunizations, he brokered humanitarian ceasefires by exploiting the political self-interests of presidents and warlords alike. Grant at first met fierce resistance at the United Nations and in his own organization, and some thought his ideas were crazy and dangerous. But as he kept toppling obstacle after obstacle, he eventually won over even his most stubborn detractors. Grant spearheaded a...
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Bhutanese Tales of the Yeti

Bhutanese Tales of the Yeti is a collection of twenty-two stories set in four different regions of Bhutan. The presence of the yeti is ubiquitous to the kingdoms of the Himalayas, where beliefs and attitudes related to it go beyond scientific judgment and analysis. The Bhutanese consider the yeti, or the migoi, to be an essential part of the backdrop of their existence. Believed to possess supernatural powers enabling it to become invisible at will, the yeti often manifests itself in a tangible form and then suddenly vanishes, leaving behind nothing but an unexpected void. Folklore about the abominable snowman has existed for centuries; however, with the far-reaching impact of the media, the perpetuation of this oral tradition is threatened. This collection of stories is an attempt to document a vital tradition before it is wiped out entirely. The book is well illustrated and includes maps of the four regions.The author Kunzang Choden was born in Bumthang, central Bhutan in...
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The Man Who Wore His Wife's Sarong

A mother finds out her son is gay; a daughter finds out her two mothers are lesbians; a niece stumbles upon the body of her dead uncle dressed in his wife's sarong kebaya; and an old man's nascent feelings for a Filipino maid lead him back to his suppressed art. "The Man Who Wore His Wife's Sarong", Suchen Christine Lim's short stories of the unsung, unsaid and uncelebrated in Singapore, delve beneath the sunlit island's prosperity and coded decorum. Her characters chip away prejudice and sculpt it into acceptance of the other. Previously published in part as "The Lies that Build a Marriage" (shortlisted for the Singapore Literature Prize 2008), this new collection contains five additional stories.
Views: 49