The War of the Spanish Succession (1701-1714)

The War of the Spanish Succession, fought between 1701 and 1714 to decide who should inherit the Spanish throne, was a conflict on an unprecedented scale, stretching across most of western Europe, the high seas and the Americas. Yet this major subject is not well known and is little understood. That is why the publication of James Falkner’s absorbing new study is so timely and important. rn In a clear and perceptive narrative he describes and analyses the complex political manoeuvres and a series of military campaigns which also involved the threat posed by Ottoman Turks in the east and Sweden and Russia in the north. Fighting took place not just in Europe but in the Americas and Canada, and on the high seas. All European powers, large and small, were involved – France, Spain, Great Britain, Holland, Austria and Portugal were the major players.rn The end result of eleven years of outright war was a French prince firmly established on the throne in Madrid and a division of the old Spanish empire. More notably though, French power, previously so dominant, was curbed for almost ninety years.
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From Here On, Monsters

In a city locked in a kind of perpetual twilight, antiquarian bookseller Cameron Raybould accepts a very strange commission - the valuation of a rare codex. Within its fragile pages Cameron makes a curious discovery. Although seemingly ancient, the codex tells of a modern mystery: an academic missing for eleven years. Stranger still, as finding the truth becomes ever more of an obsession, Cameron begins to notice frightening lapses in memory. As if, all around, words, images, even people are beginning to fade from sight. As if unravelling the riddle of this book may be unravelling the nature of reality itself. And something frightening and unknown is taking its place...A noirish mystery, timely work of unbridled imagination from a startling new voice, Elizabeth Bryer.PRAISE FOR FROM HERE ON, MONSTERS'A novel that places the reader into the abyss of storytelling. this is more than a...
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How Miru Earned His Secret Name

This free bonus chapter shares a story not in the main novel, Wide as the Wind. It addresses how Miru, the main character, earned his secret name. Whether you have already read the novel and would like some extra background, or if you want to "test the waters" before you read Wide as the Wind, this standalone chapter will provide extra insight into our young hero, Miru.Tricked into going to Ireland by a wicked leprechaun, Astro and the gang are forced to find the King’s special pet.Only this pet is not the type of animal any dog should be made to save.It’s wicked and cruel and can make you obey its every command just by purring!That’s right - the dogs are sent all over Ireland to save a cat!On the way, they encounter a whole host of magical creatures, stunning scenery and not to mention, a very polite donkey.
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The Ingenious Gentleman and Poet Federico García Lorca Ascends to Hell

In Carlos Rojas's imaginative novel, the Spanish poet Federico García Lorca, murdered by Francoist rebels in August 1936, finds himself in an inferno that somehow resembles Breughel's Tower of Babel. He sits alone in a small theater in this private hell, viewing scenes from his own life performed over and over and over. Unexpectedly, two doppelgängers appear, one a middle-aged Lorca, the other an irascible octogenarian self, and the poet faces a nightmarish confusion of alternative identities and destinies.Carlos Rojas uses a fantastic premise—García Lorca in hell—to reexamine the poet's life and speculate on alternatives to his tragic end. Rojas creates with a surrealist's eye and a moral philosopher's mind. He conjures a profoundly original world, and in so doing earns a place among such international peers as Gabriel García Márquez, Philip Roth, J. M. Coetzee, and José Saramago.
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A Mother's Lie

When her child’s life is at stake, a mother will do anything to save him. Clara McNair is running out of time to save her son, James. When the two-year-old is diagnosed with a rare form of brain cancer, only an experimental treatment can save his life. She desperately needs money to pay for the surgery, but she’ll have to travel back to the site of her darkest memories to get it. Clara has escaped the demons of her youth—or so she thinks. It’s been ten years since the mysterious disappearance of her parents. Widely suspected of murdering her mother and father, Clara fled west to start a new life. Now, a documentary film crew is offering cold, hard cash—enough to pay for James’s treatment—in exchange for the sordid secrets of her past. With no other choice but to delve into a long-ago tragedy, Clara must unravel the lies surrounding that terrible night. Facing hostile gossip, Clara is fighting to clear her name and learn the truth about what really happened. But how far will she go into the dark to save her son—and herself?
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Stone in a Landslide

The beginning of the 20th century: 13-year-old Conxa leaves her home village in the Pyrenees to work for her childless aunt. After years of hardship she finds love with Jaume – a love that will be thwarted by the Spanish Civil War. Approaching her own death, Conxa looks back on a life in which she has lost everything except her own indomitable spirit."There is an understated power in Barbal's depiction of how the forces of history can shape the life of the powerless." Financial Times"So vibrant, that it makes me want to take scissors to everything else I read." The GuardianThe Catalan modern classic, first published in 1985, now in its 50th edition, with over 50 000 copies sold in the last two years in Germany alone, is published for the first time in English.THE INDEPENDENT BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2010FOYLES BOOKS OF THE YEAR 2010
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The Valley of the Fallen

Acclaimed translator Edith Grossman brings to English-language readers Rojas's imaginative vision of Francisco de Goya and the reverberations of his art in Fascist SpainThis historical novel by one of Spain's most celebrated authors weaves a tale of disparate time periods: the early years of the nineteenth century, when Francisco de Goya was at the height of his artistic career, and the final years of Generalissimo Franco's Fascist rule in the 1970s. Rojas re-creates the nineteenth-century corridors of power and portrays the relationship between Goya and King Fernando VII, a despot bent on establishing a cruel regime after Spain's War of Independence. Goya obliges the king's request for a portrait, but his depiction not only fails to flatter but reflects a terrible darkness and grotesqueness. More than a century later, transcending conventional time, Goya observes Franco's body lying in state and experiences again a dark and monstrous despair. Rojas's work is a...
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Life Embitters

A book of stories, or "narrations," by the finest Catalan writer of his generation. In this beautiful work, translated into English for the first time, Pla transcribes his witnessings of basic truths: the waves of the sea, the hardness of rolled tobacco. The reader feels tangibly the pleasure with which Pla puts the sensual and real on paper.
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