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Fresh Mint with Lemon

During a sultry month on the Mediterranean coast, tension mounts in a triangle of love, power, and desire between a Russian art critic, an American artist, and a provocative activistRussian art critic Vadim meets a mysterious North American artist of Russian origins, Patricia Pavloff, in Saint Petersburg. Captivated by the painter's brilliance, the young critic travels to the coastal Catalonian town of Sitges, where Patricia lives, hoping to interview her and write a book about her work. Vadim's dreams of being admitted to the inner sanctuary of the artist's studio wax and wane as Patricia's personality oscillates between two extremes. She's friendly and playful one moment, cold and distant the next. Patricia shares her house with the voluptuous and provocative Radhika, whose power games foster an unsettling dynamic between the three. Attracted by Radhika's beauty but repelled by her politics, Vadim doesn't know which of the two women he desires most. Underlying the sexual and...
Views: 613

The Silent Woman

A rapturous novel of love, longing, and exile, The Silent Woman depicts a twentieth century woman's life against a backdrop of war and political turmoil.Sylva, half Czech and half German, is born into an aristocratic family and lives in a castle outside Prague. She marries a man she doesn't love and is seduced by the joyful madness of Paris in the 1920s as an ambassador's wife. When the Nazis force her to state her loyalty, she capitulates, not realizing how this decision will inform and haunt the rest of her life. Sylva's story is interwoven with a contemporary sex chronicle of her son Jan, a world-renowned mathematician and émigré living in the United States, who exudes the restlessness of a man without a country.
Views: 446

The Buttoned Sky

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.
Views: 327

The Giants From Outer Space

Unlike some other reproductions of classic texts (1) We have not used OCR(Optical Character Recognition), as this leads to bad quality books with introduced typos. (2) In books where there are images such as portraits, maps, sketches etc We have endeavoured to keep the quality of these images, so they represent accurately the original artefact. Although occasionally there may be certain imperfections with these old texts, we feel they deserve to be made available for future generations to enjoy.
Views: 322

The Date

Stacy Donovan just got dumped and to make matters worse, her best friend, Keith, needs her help to woo a new girlfriend."A practice date," he says, so he can learn how to treat a lady on their first date. With reluctance, she agrees; he is her best friend after all.THIS IS A [[CLEAN]] YA ROMANCE SHORT STORY ABOUT TEENAGERS!! THIS IS NOT TO BE MISTAKEN FOR SOMETHING SIMILAR TO 50 SHADES OF GREY!Discover #1 bestselling novel, Evan Burl and the FallingA monster lives in all of us.My father abandoned me when I was an infant.My friends have turned against me.My uncle hates me.The most powerful sapients in the world want me dead.They all have one thing in common.They think I'm turning into a monster.I'm starting to worry they're right.Over a thousand years, one man unlocks sapience—the ability to transform the imagined into reality. But not everyone believes sapience is a gift because this power blurs the lines between dreaming and waking, making it impossible to divide real life from nightmare and friend from enemy.The most powerful of these sapients rule the world, sharing little in common save their venom for each other and lurid horror for Evan Burl—a sixteen-year-old imprisoned with twelve immortal orphans in a haunted castle surrounded by the bones of a forgotten city. Evan finds a letter that orders his execution—signed by his own father—that reveals Evan's latent supernatural talents. As Evan makes use of his new abilities, he loses his grasp on the physical world and fears he might be responsible for the string of gruesome deaths that have begun to plague the orphans. With each passing day, Evan's waking world is fading into a mist of dreams, replaced by starless nightmares that just might be real. The fates of those who remain alive rest on whether Evan can regain his ability to tell dream from reality and save his friends from the sapients who would rather the world forget that these twelve orphans ever lived. PRAISE FOR EVAN BURL AND THE FALLING“Justin Blaney’s descriptive, yet punchy writing style is just one way Evan Burl and the Falling separates itself from the vast majority of young adult and fantasy writing being published today. With its intelligent and gripping storyline, relatable heroes, and highly-imagined villains this book captured my attention from the start. I can’t wait to read what happens next.”—Freya Hind"The best fantasy book I've ever read" —Mitsy Princell“Brilliant. I am recommending this book to all my friends”—Julia (from Amazon.com) “Evan Burl is one of the most imaginative and creative (novels) I’ve read in a long time. Fans of fast-paced, action-packed fantasy will find a lot to love...”—Alyce Reese“Well-crafted. Mysterious. Intriguing.”—H.J. van der Klis “I usually don’t enjoy books of this genre... I’m really glad I took a chance. The characters were rich as was the story line. I couldn’t put it down!!!” —Julie Weber“Reading Evan Burl reminded me of how I felt when I read great books like Harry Potter or The Hunger Games for the first time.”—Katie Zinda
Views: 266

I Found My Friends

I Found My Friends recreates the short and tempestuous times of Nirvana through the musicians and producers who played and interacted with the band. The guides for this trip didn't just watch the life of this legendary band—they lived it. Soulsby interviewed over 150 musicians from bands that played and toured with Nirvana, including well-known alternative bands like Dinosaur Jr., The Dead Kennedys, and Butthole Surfers, as well as scores of smaller, but no less fascinating bands.In this groundbreaking look at a legendary band, readers will see a more personal history of Nirvana than ever before, including Nirvana's consideration of nearly a dozen previously unmentioned candidates for drummer before settling on David Grohl, a recounting of Nirvana's famously disastrous South American shows from never-before-heard sources on Brazilian and Argentine sides, and the man who hosted the first ever Nirvana gig's recollections of jamming with the band at that inaugural...
Views: 53

Happiness is Possible

Happiness is Possible tells the story of a writer late delivering his novel, unable to write anything uplifting since his wife walked out. All he can produce is notes about the happiness of others. But something draws him into the Moscow lives around him, bringing together lonely neighbours, restoring lost love, and helping out with building renovations. And happiness seems determined to catch up with him as well...
Views: 48

Goya's Glass

The Duchess of Alba, known as Goya's muse, recalls the passions of youth on her deathbed in the royal court of eighteenth-century Madrid. A young woman defies the protocols of her arranged marriage and pursues love—and the life of a published writer—until her readers condemn her as a danger to society in the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Nina Berberova escapes persecution during the Russian Revolution and flees to Paris, where the intelligentsia naïvely covet the promise of a Soviet Union. These three women attempt to find passion and intimacy in worlds that rarely accommodate female desire. Goya's Glass is an unforgettable novel of guilty pleasures coursing through history.Monika Zgustová was born in Prague and lives in Barcelona, Spain. She has published seven books, including novels, short stories, a play, and a biography. Her novel The Silent Woman was a runner-up for the National Award for the Novel, given by the Spanish Ministry of Culture. Zgustová has also received the Ciutat de Barcelona and the Mercè Rodoreda awards in Spain, and the Gratias Agit Award given by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Prague. She has translated more than fifty books of Russian and Czech fiction and poetry, including the works of Milan Kundera and Vaclav Havel, into both Spanish and Catalan.Review"In her first novel to be translated into English, Prague-born writer Zgustova masterfully reimagines the true stories of three inimitable women--the Duchess of Alba, the lover and muse of 18th-century Spanish painter Francisco Goya; Božema Nemcová, a Czech writer and nationalist living in the 19th-century Austro-Hungarian empire; and Nina Berberova, a Russian exile residing in Paris during the former's revolution. Readers learn of the Duchess' passionate encounters with Goya through her 1st-person accounts. Likewise, through intimate reflections, telegrams, and reports propagated by the protectors of the "Austrian fatherland," Zgustova diagrams the surveillance and attempted repression of the tenacious Nemcová's voice and spirit. Nina Berberova fled from the newly installed Soviet regime in 1922 with poet Vladislav Felitsianovich Khodasevich, whose amorous musings on their relationship are interweaved with Berberova's sentimental letters detailing the plight of their home country. For Zgustova and her triad of women, the experience of exile--so delicately rendered in Berberova's letters--is as palpable as the struggle to survive beneath the weight of a repressive regime, as documented in Nemcová's life story. Inhabiting the crossroad between history and imagination, Zgustova's new novel is a tantalizing and powerful effort." —Publishers Weekly“A powerful testament to the determination of women to circumvent stifling societal strictures and boundaries." —Booklist"Monika Zgustova's concerns are close to my own: the fate of the individual in the hands of totalitarianism. She is an outstanding writer, whose fiction invokes the politics and culture of people throughout history."—Vaclav Havel"Three centuries, three solitudes, three unbridled passions, three indomitable women—Monika Zgustova is a born storyteller. Goya's Glass is a magnificent achievement."—Josef Skvorecky, The Engineer of Human Souls“The portraits of three women of different nationalities and centuries in Goya's Glass reveal a unique voice that owes as much to Kundera as to Flaubert, to Hasek as to Tolstoy. Monika Zgustova is a perfect example of a writer without borders, whose literary creations include the cultures and languages that she has accumulated throughout her lifetime.”—Juan Goytisolo, Exiled from Almost EverywhereAbout the AuthorMonika Zgustová: Monika Zgustová was born in Prague and lives in Barcelona. She has published seven books, including novels, short stories, a play, and a biography. Her novel The Silent Woman (2005) was one of two runners-up for the National Award for the Novel, given by the Spanish Ministry of Culture. Zgustová has also received the Giutat de Barcelona and the Mercè Rodoreda awards in Spain, and the Gratias Agist Prize given by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Prague. She has translated more than fifty books of Russian and Czech fiction and poetry, including the works of Milan Kundera and Vaclav Havel, into both Spanish and Catalan.
Views: 43

Little Boy Blues

For Malcolm Jones, his parents' disintegrating marriage was at the center of life in North Carolina in the 1950s and 60s. His father, charming but careless, was often drunk and away from home; his mother, a schoolteacher and faded Southern belle, clung to the past and hungered for respectability. In Little Boy Lost, Jones--one of our most admired cultural observers--recalls a childhood in which this relationship played out against the larger cracks of society: the convulsions of desegregation and a popular culture that threatens the church-centered life of his family. He richly evokes a time and place with rare depth and candor, giving us the fundamental stories of a life--where he comes from, who he was, who he has become.From the Trade Paperback edition.
Views: 19

The Naked Year

Boris Pilnyak, an important stylistic force in twentieth-century Russian literature, never shied from controversy. It was his novel The Naked Year, a flinchingly honest portrayal of life in post-Revolutionary Russia, that catapulted Pilnyak into notoriety. The Naked Year follows the provincial town of Ordinin through 1919, a year of war, illness, and tumultuous change. The village and its inhabitants--merchants, nobles, peasants, and communists alike--experience firsthand the impact of the violent revolutionary struggle of the Reds, Whites, Blacks, and Greens, until their world eventually dissolves into chaos. So lyrical and surreal that it has been called the "anti-novel," The Naked Year captures the emotional heart of a land trapped in the horrific gap year between frenzied Revolution and rigid Soviet control Review"Pilniak's anti-novel The Naked Year…was one of the earliest and most prominent large-scale attempts to create a paradigm of ‘the new prose' about the Revolution. A self-consciously experimental, openly modernist work." --The Cambridge Companion to Twentieth-Century Russian LiteratureAbout the AuthorBoris Pilnyak is the author of The Naked Year, Mahogany (also published by Ardis), and The Volga Falls to the Caspian Sea. In 1937 he was arrested on charges of counter-revolutionary activities, spying, and terrorism. He was tried on April 21, 1938 (in a proceeding that lasted 15 minutes) and condemned to death.
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