Christmas at The New Yorker

From the pages of America's most influential magazine come eight decades of holiday cheer--plus the occasional comical coal in the stocking--in one incomparable collection. Sublime and ridiculous, sentimental and searing, Christmas at The New Yorker is a gift of great writing and drawing by literary legends and laugh-out-loud cartoonists.Here are seasonal stories, poems, memoirs, and more, including such classics as John Cheever's 1949 story "Christmas Is a Sad Season for the Poor," about an elevator operator in a Park Avenue apartment building who experiences the ckle power of charity; John Updike's "The Carol Sing," in which a group of small-town carolers remember an exceptionally enthusiastic fellow singer ("How he would jubilate, how he would God-rest those merry gentlemen, how he would boom out when the male voices became King Wenceslas"); and Richard Ford's acerbic and elegiac 1998 story "Crèche," in which an unmarried Hollywood...
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