• Home
  • Investigative Journalism

Blood and Guts

"I pull on my balaclava and step onto the bridge wing. It's loud outside: I can hear the rumbles of nine vessels' engines and the hiss of ten water cannons ... Suddenly the bridge is full of refugees from the upper deck. They are blocking my view out the back windows, but their faces – afraid, excited, awestruck – illustrate the looming presence of the Nisshin. I bend my knees and grip the bench, ready for the crunch."In Blood and Guts, Sam Vincent plunges into the whale wars.Vincent sets sail with Sea Shepherd, led by the charismatic and abrasive Paul Watson. He attends the recent case at the International Court of Justice, which finds Japan's 'scientific' whaling in the Southern Ocean to be unlawful. And he travels to Japan to investigate why its government doggedly continues to bankroll the unprofitable hunt.This is a fresh, funny and intelligent look at how Australia has become the most vocal anti-whaling nation on Earth. Vincent...
Views: 676

Ten Days in a Mad-House

Soon to be a major motion picture: A courageous female journalist's classic exposé of the horrific treatment of the mentally ill in nineteenth-century America In 1887, Nellie Bly accepted an assignment from publisher Joseph Pulitzer of the New York World and went undercover at the lunatic asylum on Blackwell Island, America's first municipal mental hospital. Calling herself "Nellie Brown," she was able to convince policemen, a judge, and a series of doctors of her madness with a few well-practiced facial expressions of derangement. At the institution, Bly discovered the stuff of nightmares. Mentally ill patients were fed rotten, inedible food; violently abused by a brutal, uncaring staff; and misdiagnosed, mistreated, or generally ignored by the doctors and so-called mental health experts entrusted with their care. To her horror, Bly encountered sane patients who had been committed on the barest of pretenses and came to the shocking realization...
Views: 72